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On Comics

brudesworld
brudesworld:

Gil Kane, 1966

Kane did a bunch of great covers towards the end of his run. (I suspect these were not Infantino layouts.)

brudesworld:

Gil Kane, 1966

Kane did a bunch of great covers towards the end of his run. (I suspect these were not Infantino layouts.)

I have a vision… Superman and Batman taken over by Archie.

I have a vision… Superman and Batman taken over by Archie.

Hey, look! Comics!

Hey, look! Comics!

themarvelageofcomics

themarvelageofcomics:

Penciled page from FANTASTIC FOUR #49 by Jack Kirby.

Kriby’s border notes read:

GALACTUS WHISTLES FOR BRUTE. HE SAYS — YOU GOT THE PESTS AT BAY — THEY’LL HOLD FOR AWHILE

REED SAYS — GALACTUS’ OVER-CONFIDENCE IS OUR ONLY WEAPON — HE’S GIVING US THE (word obscured) TO FIND A NEW

And to the right, the final page as published

themarvelageofcomics
themarvelageofcomics:

Page from FANTASTIC FOUR #59 by Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott

Great page from a great storyline.

themarvelageofcomics:

Page from FANTASTIC FOUR #59 by Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott

Great page from a great storyline.

themarvelageofcomics
themarvelageofcomics:

Jack Kirby’s pencils to the final page of the Inhumans story in THOR #147
Kirby’s border notes read:
HAND REACHES OUT — ROCKS SENTRY WITH ENERGY BLAST — VOICE SAYS ARE THE KREE AFRAID OF OUR GAINING POWER AS GREAT AS THEIRS?
SEE WHAT THE RAYS HAVE DONE FOR ME — THE POWER IN MY HANDS — OUR ENTIRE RACE WILL SOON HAVE IT —
SENTRY SAYS — BEWARE OF THIS POWER — WITH IT WILL COME CHANGE — YOUR PEOPLE WILL BE DIFFERENT FROM REST OF MAN
SENTRY LEAVES - NEVER TO RETURN — THE KREE HAVE FAILED WITH THIS RACE — THE REST OF MANKIND WILL FEAR AND SHUN THEM

themarvelageofcomics:

Jack Kirby’s pencils to the final page of the Inhumans story in THOR #147

Kirby’s border notes read:

HAND REACHES OUT — ROCKS SENTRY WITH ENERGY BLAST — VOICE SAYS ARE THE KREE AFRAID OF OUR GAINING POWER AS GREAT AS THEIRS?

SEE WHAT THE RAYS HAVE DONE FOR ME — THE POWER IN MY HANDS — OUR ENTIRE RACE WILL SOON HAVE IT —

SENTRY SAYS — BEWARE OF THIS POWER — WITH IT WILL COME CHANGE — YOUR PEOPLE WILL BE DIFFERENT FROM REST OF MAN

SENTRY LEAVES - NEVER TO RETURN — THE KREE HAVE FAILED WITH THIS RACE — THE REST OF MANKIND WILL FEAR AND SHUN THEM

themarvelageofcomics
themarvelageofcomics:

Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, on left, at a meeting of the National Cartoonists Society, circa 1966

You’ll never see Lee balder.

themarvelageofcomics:

Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, on left, at a meeting of the National Cartoonists Society, circa 1966

You’ll never see Lee balder.

seanhowe

seanhowe:

JACK KIRBY IN CONTEXT

Two years ago, Jack Kirby’s granddaughter Jillian launched Kirby4Heroes, a campaign to raise funds for the Hero Initiative, which helps comic artists in need. On the Kirby4Heroes Facebook page, Jillian posted several vintage pictures of her grandfather.

I thought it would be illuminating to provide a guide to what Kirby was working on at the time of each photo. Sometimes we forget that personal and professional lives don’t exist in vacuums.

(1) July 1941: Only months after the introduction of Captain America, Kirby and Joe Simon would soon leave Timely Comics. Jack and Roz Kirby spent a day at Brighton Beach.

(2) May 1961: Fantastic Four #1 was in development. It would hit newsstands on August 8. Bar Mitzvah for Neal Kirby.

(3) December 1963. Avengers #4, featuring the return of Captain America, was on newsstands. Tales of Suspense #52, featuring the first appearance of Black Widow, was at the printers. The growing Kirby family celebrated Hanukkah.

(4) July 1965: The debuts of the Inhumans (in Fantastic Four) and the Sentinels (in X-Men) were in production.

(5) June 1966: The fully-Kirby-scripted S.H.I.E.L.D. story in Strange Tales #148 hit newsstands (along with all of these). “I [did] a little editing later, but it was [Jack’s] story.” Lee said in an interview. Neal Kirby graduated.

On July 12, after Joe Simon began efforts to claim sole ownership of Captain America, Martin Goodman persuaded Jack Kirby to sign a deposition stating that Captain America, and all the work he’d done for Timely in the early 40s, was done with the understanding that it “belonged to Timely.”


(You can read much more about this in Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.)

All images ©
2013 by Connie, Neal and Jillian Kirby.

(via themarvelageofcomics)

seanhowe

seanhowe:

(1) Walter Simonson, Joe Rubinstein, Pat Broderick, and Ralph Reese pose for Larry Hama.

(2) Marvel Premiere #19, November 1974. Art by Larry Hama and Dick Giordano. Words by Doug Moench.

(via themarvelageofcomics)

batgirlofburnside
batgirlofburnside:

Don’t forget to PREORDER Batgirl #35 at your local comic shop TODAY!  If you haven’t already, please tell your retailer that you want - need - a copy of Batgirl #35.  
(Animated GIF by Babs!) 

Aw, sweet!

batgirlofburnside:

Don’t forget to PREORDER Batgirl #35 at your local comic shop TODAY!  If you haven’t already, please tell your retailer that you want - need - a copy of Batgirl #35.  

(Animated GIF by Babs!) 

Aw, sweet!

noahvansciver
noahvansciver:

Sketchbook page.

Sad if true. Hope not.

noahvansciver:

Sketchbook page.

Sad if true. Hope not.

comicsalliance.com
If you weren’t already sold on writer Jason Latour (Southern Bastards) and artist Robbi Rodriguez (FBP) doing a re-imagining of Gwen Stacy in which she is a new version of Spider-Woman in Edge of Spider-Verse #2, what if I offered you this to sweeten the deal: Gwen is the drummer in a band, they’re called the Mary Janes, and they have a song that ruminates on Mary Jane Watson’s classic “Face it tiger, you just hit the jackpot” line from Amazing Spider-Man #42.

'Edge Of Spider-Verse' #2 Preview: Spider-Woman's Rad Band

At the end of the dray, Kirby was hands down either the most procreative artist known to the funnies or, given the course of his career — jumping all over the place then the demands of Marvel in the 60s —  he was required to be the most procreative artist known to the funnies.
This was fueled by some degree of autodidactism, the scope of which is unknown to me.
But that he knew of panopticons, that kind of impresses me.

At the end of the dray, Kirby was hands down either the most procreative artist known to the funnies or, given the course of his career — jumping all over the place then the demands of Marvel in the 60s —  he was required to be the most procreative artist known to the funnies.

This was fueled by some degree of autodidactism, the scope of which is unknown to me.

But that he knew of panopticons, that kind of impresses me.

I loved this when I read it: Colored fireballs.

I loved this when I read it: Colored fireballs.